Should EPA Magazines Publish More Poems?

By Chris Maxwell Poetry is, at least for me, like life. Life isn’t a three-point sermon. Life isn’t a doctrinal debate. Life isn’t a lecture series. Life isn’t a new platform for the coolest and newest and tightest and loudest performance. Life, to me, is poetry. I know. Many poems aren’t smooth. They aren’t always […]

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What Policies do EPA Member Magazines Have in Regard to Permissions?

Some EPA members have asked for guidance on securing permission from people mentioned in articles. The following questions were sent to editors of some of the largest publications/organizations represented in the EPA membership. What is your publication doing in regard to securing permission from real people who are used in stories and articles? Do you […]

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The Art of Omission: Chipping away what doesn’t belong

By Andy Butcher I have always found the Journalism 101 guide—who, what, why, where, when, and how—to be of limited help. It’s a bit like telling an Olympic track hopeful that all they need to do to win a gold medal is run faster than everyone else. Yes, but… Which whats? What whens? Whose wheres? […]

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Why Do You Ask? Some Thoughts on The Tough Interviews

By Michael Longinow There are two questions every interviewed source wants to know about a journalist’s questions: “Why do you want to know?” and “How are you going to use what I tell you?” The second is closely related to one more: “Can I trust you to do what you say you’re going to do?” […]

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EPA-ACP to Host Regional Seminars on Content Strategy and Writing

The Evangelical Press Association and the Associated Church Press are co-sponsoring three one-day regional intensive seminars in select cities this fall. In Washington, D.C., magazine consultant Lou Ann Sabatier will teach a class on content strategy on Friday, October 26. Lou Ann is a highly sought-after publishing consultant, renowned for her high energy and infectious […]

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Tips & Tools for Effective Research

By Lisa A. Crayton Research is either a much-loved task, humdrum chore or angst-filled process, depending which writers or editors are asked. Whether loved or dreaded, research is a building block for effective fiction and nonfiction projects. As a freelance magazine and devotional writer, I’ve used research in myriad ways, including to find or verify […]

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Editors’ Wish List when Working with Freelancers

When pitching to a publication for the first time: Study the publication you’re pitching to in order to make sure your story idea is in line with their mission. Ask for a copy of the writers’ guidelines. (Better yet, see if they’re available on the website before you ask.) Most publications likely have some already […]

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Freelancers’ Wish List

Professional writers are key suppliers of quality editorial content. Magazine and newspaper editors are, in turn, key players in the relationship between their publication and freelance writers. For many years, EPA Associate Members who work as freelance writers have repeatedly encountered several challenges when writing for EPA and other publications. To work toward improving the […]

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Five Common Weaknesses Seen in Higher Goals Contest Entries

By Andy Butcher What with fake news, partisan press, and click-bait, there may well never have been a time when we have more needed good Christian journalists practicing good Christian journalism. Thankfully, having had the privilege of judging some of the categories in the EPA Higher Goals contest over the past couple of years, I […]

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It’s So Much Easier to Be Biased

By Diane McDougall Earlier this year I published what might well have been the most challenging piece of journalism I’ve ever tackled. “Most challenging” is obviously relative. I’ve never been assigned to report on starving children in a dusty African nation, torn between recording comments about their protruding bellies and picking them up in my […]

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